Black folk & the paranormal

The Heiress
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My mom was religious (plus superstitious) and so was my maternal grandmother and grandfather. We talked about ghost and movies, shoot my mom was the main one I'd watched scary movies with. I had a neighbor who told great scary stories to the neighborhood kids.

My mom would mention things she had been by her mother like,
Burning your shed hair so people can't use it against you (root work/voodoo/hoodoo)

Covering mirrors during a thunderstorm because they attract lightening

If you hear your name being called wait to answer (I think there's a scientific term for this)

I have an aunt who was born with a caul (same as the phrase mentioned about, born with a veil)

Edit: typos
 
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and always remember, that’s life.
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I'm looking to connect with other descendants of formerly enslaved Americans as I'm curious what you were taught about the paranormal. I dabble in both genealogical and paranormal research. I have traced several lines of my tree back to the 1850s. These ancestors were enslaved people with the oldest documented ancestor being born in the late 1790s.

Speaking in terms of generations, my mom's family has been in Georgia while my dad's family is from Tennessee. I am lucky to say that on both sides of my family, there are structures that still exist dating to the mid-1800s. Specifically, the house where my grandmother (who was born in 1912/1913) and her father were born (early 1890s) still stands. I would love to visit the farm and do an EVP session to see if any of my ancestors would speak to me.

Now, I don't know about other Black folk descended from American slaves, but I was taught that talking about ghosts was off-limits. Don't say the names of deceased people because their restless spirit may find you. Or, don't whistle inside of the house as roaming spirits believe it's an invitation. However, my grandmother also told me about being born "with a veil" which allowed you to see into the spirit world. She was born with such a veil, and she loved telling me ghost stories as many of them were just interactions with friends and family members who had passed on.

There was one story from when my grandmother was a new mom in her late teens. My uncle was colicky and was crying non-stop. My grandmother was in a panic, and was seriously at the point of wishing harm on my uncle. So, she placed him in the cradle and walked away, then she began praying to her ancestors for help. His cradle was located in the corner, and my grandma recalled seeing a shadow arm appear from that wall and begin to rock his cradle. He started laughing, then she heard someone tell her to rest, which she did.

I have trips planned to visit my family's lands in Georgia and Tennessee this summer. Primarily, I will be focused on researching land deeds and obtaining copies of marriage/death/birth certificates if they exist, but I am also thinking of visiting these lands to talk with my folk.

How many of you also learned about the "veil"? Were you taught talking about ghosts was taboo? On a sidenote, my research is likely to take me to a few plantations, and I know there are members of my family who absolutely refuse to visit a plantation. Have you or would you be willing to?
Interesting. My mom always told me not to whistle in the house too but wouldn’t really elaborate.
 
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I'm looking to connect with other descendants of formerly enslaved Americans as I'm curious what you were taught about the paranormal. I dabble in both genealogical and paranormal research. I have traced several lines of my tree back to the 1850s. These ancestors were enslaved people with the oldest documented ancestor being born in the late 1790s.

Speaking in terms of generations, my mom's family has been in Georgia while my dad's family is from Tennessee. I am lucky to say that on both sides of my family, there are structures that still exist dating to the mid-1800s. Specifically, the house where my grandmother (who was born in 1912/1913) and her father were born (early 1890s) still stands. I would love to visit the farm and do an EVP session to see if any of my ancestors would speak to me.

Now, I don't know about other Black folk descended from American slaves, but I was taught that talking about ghosts was off-limits. Don't say the names of deceased people because their restless spirit may find you. Or, don't whistle inside of the house as roaming spirits believe it's an invitation. However, my grandmother also told me about being born "with a veil" which allowed you to see into the spirit world. She was born with such a veil, and she loved telling me ghost stories as many of them were just interactions with friends and family members who had passed on.

There was one story from when my grandmother was a new mom in her late teens. My uncle was colicky and was crying non-stop. My grandmother was in a panic, and was seriously at the point of wishing harm on my uncle. So, she placed him in the cradle and walked away, then she began praying to her ancestors for help. His cradle was located in the corner, and my grandma recalled seeing a shadow arm appear from that wall and begin to rock his cradle. He started laughing, then she heard someone tell her to rest, which she did.

I have trips planned to visit my family's lands in Georgia and Tennessee this summer. Primarily, I will be focused on researching land deeds and obtaining copies of marriage/death/birth certificates if they exist, but I am also thinking of visiting these lands to talk with my folk.

How many of you also learned about the "veil"? Were you taught talking about ghosts was taboo? On a sidenote, my research is likely to take me to a few plantations, and I know there are members of my family who absolutely refuse to visit a plantation. Have you or would you be willing to?
my father's side (including me) are clairs. there's also a great deal of mental illness. there's a correlation and most cant come back from the darkness. grew up Christian, so were taught to fear voodoo/hoodoo/witches. I'm not saying exact location, just look closely at the words i used :) I've visited plantations, very emotional experience. made me cry when i was younger, and i didnt' understand all that much then.
 
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I've heard of the veil/caul. My great grandmother was born with one. I never met her and I knew this. It was respected it seems. No one said that about me but they may not have known either as my mom was knocked out for my birth. What they say about gg is how I am and my grandmother recognized this.
Things like this were talked about but hushed. We are a Catholic family who dabbles.
 
Da cutest chick u ever saw is a Chickasaw squaw
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I come from a long line of Louisiana Creole witches/warlocks and Black Native Americans, needles to say that the paranormal has always been a part of my families life/history, both sides of my family have spiritual gifts that have been passed down through out the generations, so you can only imagine the creepy and craziness of it all..lol

I have a auntie who put some sort of spell on my uncle over 30 years to make him stay, now she wants one of us to go back to her old home and dig up whatever she buried in that back yard, so that he will now go the fuck away and stop bothering her, she can't get rid of him and he's always on her LAST nerve..LMAO
 
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On my dad's side the a male from each generation are able to see the dead because of being born with the veil. My uncle, brother and my son all can.
 
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This is interesting because I was brought up the same way.

My family is descended from slaves that were enslaved at the Jones Plantation right outside of Raleigh, NC. My family tree has been researched/documented to the point that my father kept official records in a safe.

Half of my family settled in Garner, NC and I am practically related to every black person that lives there. The other half made their way north to NY. Whenever we visited back home, my father would visit the gravesite of his mother and father who were buried on top of each other and we as children were hushed for several days after. Whistling was an absolute no no.

Great topic, OP!
 
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. Don't say the names of deceased people because their restless spirit may find you. Or, don't whistle inside of the house as roaming spirits believe it's an invitation.

We weren't told to not speak the names of dead people, but we were told not to "summon" dead people. As far a whistling, were were just told it is bad luck to whistle in the house.
 
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My family was pagan/mystic up until the 50s, so we believe in the paranormal and witchcraft. Our (Louisiana Creole) superstitions have largely given away, but there are a few of us that still somewhat follow them. I remember seeing my grandmother in my room before she died and my mom told me she was there to pass down "the gift".

I would have loved to research more of my family history, but a lot of the written recordings were lost in a house fire.
 
You WISH I was you Auntie lol
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I'm looking to connect with other descendants of formerly enslaved Americans as I'm curious what you were taught about the paranormal. I dabble in both genealogical and paranormal research. I have traced several lines of my tree back to the 1850s. These ancestors were enslaved people with the oldest documented ancestor being born in the late 1790s.

Speaking in terms of generations, my mom's family has been in Georgia while my dad's family is from Tennessee. I am lucky to say that on both sides of my family, there are structures that still exist dating to the mid-1800s. Specifically, the house where my grandmother (who was born in 1912/1913) and her father were born (early 1890s) still stands. I would love to visit the farm and do an EVP session to see if any of my ancestors would speak to me.

Now, I don't know about other Black folk descended from American slaves, but I was taught that talking about ghosts was off-limits. Don't say the names of deceased people because their restless spirit may find you. Or, don't whistle inside of the house as roaming spirits believe it's an invitation. However, my grandmother also told me about being born "with a veil" which allowed you to see into the spirit world. She was born with such a veil, and she loved telling me ghost stories as many of them were just interactions with friends and family members who had passed on.

There was one story from when my grandmother was a new mom in her late teens. My uncle was colicky and was crying non-stop. My grandmother was in a panic, and was seriously at the point of wishing harm on my uncle. So, she placed him in the cradle and walked away, then she began praying to her ancestors for help. His cradle was located in the corner, and my grandma recalled seeing a shadow arm appear from that wall and begin to rock his cradle. He started laughing, then she heard someone tell her to rest, which she did.

I have trips planned to visit my family's lands in Georgia and Tennessee this summer. Primarily, I will be focused on researching land deeds and obtaining copies of marriage/death/birth certificates if they exist, but I am also thinking of visiting these lands to talk with my folk.

How many of you also learned about the "veil"? Were you taught talking about ghosts was taboo? On a sidenote, my research is likely to take me to a few plantations, and I know there are members of my family who absolutely refuse to visit a plantation. Have you or would you be willing to?
I wish I could go with you. I have been dying to see if I can pick up any paranormal stuff at Plantations.
 
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We go by superstition we need to do as thou wilt and let these spirits bow down to us or else we will curse they ass out. Hey great great great granny , get off ya ass and fix me some dinner
 

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