Daunte Wright called his mom before being shot. George Floyd yelled for his. As a Black mother, this is my greatest fear.

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Daunte Wright called his mom before being shot. George Floyd yelled for his. As a Black mother, this is my greatest fear.​




Dara Beevas​

Apr. 14, 2021​

I was four months pregnant the night of July 6, 2016, when, scrolling on Facebook, I realized the video showing the aftermath of Philando Castile’s death had already gone viral. His partner, Diamond Reynolds, captured his final moments in real time. It was horrific. I had nightmares for weeks. Philando was killed 10 minutes from my Minneapolis home. His locs reminded me of my brothers’; the warmth emanating from his smile was reminiscent of my husband’s. I had watched the video of Eric Garner’s death two years before that, and Tamir Rice’s only a few months later.

I vowed that the fatal shooting of Philando by a Minneapolis police officer would be the last video I’d ever watch like that. I couldn’t do it anymore.
A year later, not long after the acquittal in the case against Philando’s shooter, I was on a phone call with my dear friend Datra. We discussed motherhood — she was a mother of two, and I was a new mother of one. And while, yes, we discussed the typical plights of parenthood — sleep deprivation, work-life balance, foiled date nights — as two Black moms, most of our conversation centered on one thing: safety.

How could we keep our babies safe? What would it take to protect their autonomy and freedom of imagination? What would be the price of their mistakes compared to their White friends? As a Black mom, how could I guard my child’s birthright to be boundless in their possibilities?
[ Officer who shot Daunte Wright resigns, as does Brooklyn Center police chief]
In his final minutes last May, George Floyd called out for his mother, who had only passed away two years before. “Mama,” he shouted. “Mama ... I’m through!” It was a final plea, a surrender to the death he knew was imminent, a son reaching for his mother — a mother who couldn’t save him. I didn’t watch the more than eight minutes of Derek Chauvin’s knee slowly, tortuously forcing life from George — an action for which Chauvin is now on trial for murder in my own city. However, when I saw a short clip of that moment — the moment George cried out for his mother — I sobbed. I was undone.
http://washingtonpost.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bOvjaFgH9IrbJbg?source=site
This week, we learned that another mother, Katie Wright, was on the phone with her 20-year-old son, Daunte Wright, when he was reportedly pulled over for having air fresheners hanging from his rearview mirror. I imagine the helplessness of hearing officers demand your son get out of the car; I imagine his fear, and perhaps even the surrender, in knowing what was about to happen.
[ What do communities do when the police retreat?]
Daunte’s death was a punch in the gut like so many unnecessary police shootings before him. I screamed into a pillow. I wrote a poem about it. Despair settled into my soul. While we grapple with a trial that cannot possibly bring justice for George Floyd, Daunte’s death happening only miles from George’s is too much to bear. As always, when a Black man is killed in these inexplicable and tragic ways by police, every Black man that I love flashes through my mind. I imagine the bodies of my father, brothers, friends and husband covered with a sheet or sand or nothing, alone and dead on the pavement.

This week, my unborn son flashed across my mind to join them. I’m six months pregnant. We’ve chosen his name and painted his nursery jasper green. There’s a genuine fear that I carry, that countless mothers carry: It’s of our children surrendering to an inescapable death. There are not enough talks, lectures, horror stories or pleas to save them from a world that has yet to reckon with white terrorism.

Daunte Wright's mother recounts their last phone call during fatal traffic stop
2:01
Katie Wright spoke April 13 about the last conversation she had with her son before he was fatally shot by police at a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minn. (The Washington Post)

As a mother, I’m not afraid that my children won’t apply themselves or advocate their needs. I don’t agonize about sports, activities or which camps to sign them up for. The boogeyman isn’t a biased teacher, ignorant neighbor or racist parent — though these are realities to contend with, too. It’s the harm that will come to them while simply existing: walking home, riding in a car with friends, playing at the playground, running through their own neighborhood.
At any age, at any time, the mother of a Black child is at the mercy of unchecked racist institutions doing what they were designed and created to do — rob Black people of their lives. There is no soothing for the mother of a Black child, and there has never been in this country.
The very real nightmare is that our children will call out for us when they most need us, and we won’t be able to protect them.
Dara Beevas is co-founder and chief executive of Wise Ink.
 
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Does she feel the same when these criminal are harming other black men and black women are being harmed. She’s pregnant and should relax. That stress isn’t necessary. What happened to them was tragic but these think pieces bw believe they are doing is silly. His white fiancée didn’t even seem that angry. A bunch of black women and female children in the streets getting beat up by cops and she’s sitting pretty with her shades on on a bench. Talking about peace or whatever she said.
As always, when a Black man is killed in these inexplicable and tragic ways by police, every Black man that I love flashes through my mind. I imagine the bodies of my father, brothers, friends and husband covered with a sheet or sand or nothing, alone and dead on the pavement.
 
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I hate to say this but these guys are calling out for their mothers because they are the only family members they have/care about them.
 
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Isn’t Daunte’s mom white?
Yes she is. Daunte called his father, who is Black, but he was grocery shopping so he didn't pick up his phone. Then he called his mother. Daunte hung up on his mother though she heard the police commanding him. She called back and Daunte's girlfriend, mother of their child who was in the car and answered it after they crashed when he was dead.
 
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As a Black mom, how could I guard my child’s birthright to be boundless in their possibilities?
Black Mothers shouldn’t be expected to carry that burden, we can’t be protectors or “guards” for our children in a system of white supremacy that is heavily reinforced by the patriarchy. These racist white cops are armed and male...black women don’t stand a chance. It is simply unrealistic and unfair when you consider these factors, especially PREGNANT black women like the author. She is harming herself and unborn child agonizing over this. Smh ...

EDIT: There are def some racist non-black trolls in this thread but I’m not one. I am not downplaying the epidemic of police killings of unarmed black people at all. It is real and serious issue that threatens all black people, even the law abiding ones (look at Sandra Bland or baby Tamir Rice). It could happen to any of us, I am simply critiquing the article because the author’s mindset does more harm than good.
 
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I know I’ll get flack for saying this but where is the accountability? You know that these police officers are looking for any reason to shoot so why fight these idiots back? He would have gone to jail for a few hours maybe days if no one around could help which I doubt.

ETA: I do not believe that running from the police should be a death sentence or getting shot but we don’t have the complexion for protection. Y’all are being obtuse you can post 1000 videos of white people running and fighting cops and not getting shot. That doesn’t change the fact that we don’t have the same privilege. There is no room for error for black people with these idiots so until reform happens why escalate it if you don’t have to.
 
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Yes she is. Daunte called his father, who is Black, but he was grocery shopping so he didn't pick up his phone. Then he called his mother. Daunte hung up on his mother though she heard the police commanding him. She called back and Daunte's girlfriend, mother of their child who was in the car and answered it after they crashed when he was dead.
The whole thing is sad. Whew.
 
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Daunte Wright called his mom before being shot. George Floyd yelled for his. As a Black mother, this is my greatest fear.​




Dara Beevas​

Apr. 14, 2021​

I was four months pregnant the night of July 6, 2016, when, scrolling on Facebook, I realized the video showing the aftermath of Philando Castile’s death had already gone viral. His partner, Diamond Reynolds, captured his final moments in real time. It was horrific. I had nightmares for weeks. Philando was killed 10 minutes from my Minneapolis home. His locs reminded me of my brothers’; the warmth emanating from his smile was reminiscent of my husband’s. I had watched the video of Eric Garner’s death two years before that, and Tamir Rice’s only a few months later.

I vowed that the fatal shooting of Philando by a Minneapolis police officer would be the last video I’d ever watch like that. I couldn’t do it anymore.
A year later, not long after the acquittal in the case against Philando’s shooter, I was on a phone call with my dear friend Datra. We discussed motherhood — she was a mother of two, and I was a new mother of one. And while, yes, we discussed the typical plights of parenthood — sleep deprivation, work-life balance, foiled date nights — as two Black moms, most of our conversation centered on one thing: safety.

How could we keep our babies safe? What would it take to protect their autonomy and freedom of imagination? What would be the price of their mistakes compared to their White friends? As a Black mom, how could I guard my child’s birthright to be boundless in their possibilities?
[ Officer who shot Daunte Wright resigns, as does Brooklyn Center police chief]
In his final minutes last May, George Floyd called out for his mother, who had only passed away two years before. “Mama,” he shouted. “Mama ... I’m through!” It was a final plea, a surrender to the death he knew was imminent, a son reaching for his mother — a mother who couldn’t save him. I didn’t watch the more than eight minutes of Derek Chauvin’s knee slowly, tortuously forcing life from George — an action for which Chauvin is now on trial for murder in my own city. However, when I saw a short clip of that moment — the moment George cried out for his mother — I sobbed. I was undone.
http://washingtonpost.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bOvjaFgH9IrbJbg?source=site
This week, we learned that another mother, Katie Wright, was on the phone with her 20-year-old son, Daunte Wright, when he was reportedly pulled over for having air fresheners hanging from his rearview mirror. I imagine the helplessness of hearing officers demand your son get out of the car; I imagine his fear, and perhaps even the surrender, in knowing what was about to happen.
[ What do communities do when the police retreat?]
Daunte’s death was a punch in the gut like so many unnecessary police shootings before him. I screamed into a pillow. I wrote a poem about it. Despair settled into my soul. While we grapple with a trial that cannot possibly bring justice for George Floyd, Daunte’s death happening only miles from George’s is too much to bear. As always, when a Black man is killed in these inexplicable and tragic ways by police, every Black man that I love flashes through my mind. I imagine the bodies of my father, brothers, friends and husband covered with a sheet or sand or nothing, alone and dead on the pavement.

This week, my unborn son flashed across my mind to join them. I’m six months pregnant. We’ve chosen his name and painted his nursery jasper green. There’s a genuine fear that I carry, that countless mothers carry: It’s of our children surrendering to an inescapable death. There are not enough talks, lectures, horror stories or pleas to save them from a world that has yet to reckon with white terrorism.

Daunte Wright's mother recounts their last phone call during fatal traffic stop
2:01
Katie Wright spoke April 13 about the last conversation she had with her son before he was fatally shot by police at a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minn. (The Washington Post)

As a mother, I’m not afraid that my children won’t apply themselves or advocate their needs. I don’t agonize about sports, activities or which camps to sign them up for. The boogeyman isn’t a biased teacher, ignorant neighbor or racist parent — though these are realities to contend with, too. It’s the harm that will come to them while simply existing: walking home, riding in a car with friends, playing at the playground, running through their own neighborhood.
At any age, at any time, the mother of a Black child is at the mercy of unchecked racist institutions doing what they were designed and created to do — rob Black people of their lives. There is no soothing for the mother of a Black child, and there has never been in this country.
The very real nightmare is that our children will call out for us when they most need us, and we won’t be able to protect them.
Dara Beevas is co-founder and chief executive of Wise Ink.
Her greatest fear should be her black ass daughter being murdered at the hands of a black man. The chances of that happening are far greater than a bm being shot (FOR NO REASON) by the police. Foh
 
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If the cops could contain themselves on the 6th of January then no need to continue to kill black men and women for nonsense. There was no reason to kill this young man.
Please watch white privilige interaction with the cops who didn't get shot. These cops do have a choice not to kill black people if they didn't want to.
 
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Her greatest fear should be her black ass daughter being murdered at the hands of a black man. The chances of that happening are far greater than a bm being shot (FOR NO REASON) by the police. Foh
It's always "for no reason," but 8 out of 10 of these men always have criminal records. You can't make this up lol.
 
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While the cop who shot Daunte is a low IQ clown who deserves a long prison stint, Daunte did absolutely jump right into the driver's seat and attempt to flee. Now, why would this be this black mom's greatest fear? Does she suspect her own son moving foolishly like this?

These think pieces are exhausting and almost always write off basic accountability.
 
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Daunte Wright called his mom before being shot. George Floyd yelled for his. As a Black mother, this is my greatest fear.​




Dara Beevas​

Apr. 14, 2021​

I was four months pregnant the night of July 6, 2016, when, scrolling on Facebook, I realized the video showing the aftermath of Philando Castile’s death had already gone viral. His partner, Diamond Reynolds, captured his final moments in real time. It was horrific. I had nightmares for weeks. Philando was killed 10 minutes from my Minneapolis home. His locs reminded me of my brothers’; the warmth emanating from his smile was reminiscent of my husband’s. I had watched the video of Eric Garner’s death two years before that, and Tamir Rice’s only a few months later.

I vowed that the fatal shooting of Philando by a Minneapolis police officer would be the last video I’d ever watch like that. I couldn’t do it anymore.
A year later, not long after the acquittal in the case against Philando’s shooter, I was on a phone call with my dear friend Datra. We discussed motherhood — she was a mother of two, and I was a new mother of one. And while, yes, we discussed the typical plights of parenthood — sleep deprivation, work-life balance, foiled date nights — as two Black moms, most of our conversation centered on one thing: safety.

How could we keep our babies safe? What would it take to protect their autonomy and freedom of imagination? What would be the price of their mistakes compared to their White friends? As a Black mom, how could I guard my child’s birthright to be boundless in their possibilities?
[ Officer who shot Daunte Wright resigns, as does Brooklyn Center police chief]
In his final minutes last May, George Floyd called out for his mother, who had only passed away two years before. “Mama,” he shouted. “Mama ... I’m through!” It was a final plea, a surrender to the death he knew was imminent, a son reaching for his mother — a mother who couldn’t save him. I didn’t watch the more than eight minutes of Derek Chauvin’s knee slowly, tortuously forcing life from George — an action for which Chauvin is now on trial for murder in my own city. However, when I saw a short clip of that moment — the moment George cried out for his mother — I sobbed. I was undone.
http://washingtonpost.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bOvjaFgH9IrbJbg?source=site
This week, we learned that another mother, Katie Wright, was on the phone with her 20-year-old son, Daunte Wright, when he was reportedly pulled over for having air fresheners hanging from his rearview mirror. I imagine the helplessness of hearing officers demand your son get out of the car; I imagine his fear, and perhaps even the surrender, in knowing what was about to happen.
[ What do communities do when the police retreat?]
Daunte’s death was a punch in the gut like so many unnecessary police shootings before him. I screamed into a pillow. I wrote a poem about it. Despair settled into my soul. While we grapple with a trial that cannot possibly bring justice for George Floyd, Daunte’s death happening only miles from George’s is too much to bear. As always, when a Black man is killed in these inexplicable and tragic ways by police, every Black man that I love flashes through my mind. I imagine the bodies of my father, brothers, friends and husband covered with a sheet or sand or nothing, alone and dead on the pavement.

This week, my unborn son flashed across my mind to join them. I’m six months pregnant. We’ve chosen his name and painted his nursery jasper green. There’s a genuine fear that I carry, that countless mothers carry: It’s of our children surrendering to an inescapable death. There are not enough talks, lectures, horror stories or pleas to save them from a world that has yet to reckon with white terrorism.

Daunte Wright's mother recounts their last phone call during fatal traffic stop
2:01
Katie Wright spoke April 13 about the last conversation she had with her son before he was fatally shot by police at a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minn. (The Washington Post)

As a mother, I’m not afraid that my children won’t apply themselves or advocate their needs. I don’t agonize about sports, activities or which camps to sign them up for. The boogeyman isn’t a biased teacher, ignorant neighbor or racist parent — though these are realities to contend with, too. It’s the harm that will come to them while simply existing: walking home, riding in a car with friends, playing at the playground, running through their own neighborhood.
At any age, at any time, the mother of a Black child is at the mercy of unchecked racist institutions doing what they were designed and created to do — rob Black people of their lives. There is no soothing for the mother of a Black child, and there has never been in this country.
The very real nightmare is that our children will call out for us when they most need us, and we won’t be able to protect them.
Dara Beevas is co-founder and chief executive of Wise Ink.
I need BW to stop doing this. Stop accepting this shit as a personal fear.
 
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While the cop who shot Daunte is a low IQ clown who deserves a long prison stint, Daunte did absolutely jump right into the driver's seat and attempt to flee. Now, why would this be this black mom's greatest fear? Does she suspect her own son moving foolishly like this?

These think pieces are exhausting and almost always write off basic accountability.

He deserved to die for running?
 
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Does she feel the same when these criminal are harming other black men and black women are being harmed. She’s pregnant and should relax. That stress isn’t necessary. What happened to them was tragic but these think pieces bw believe they are doing is silly. His white fiancée didn’t even seem that angry. A bunch of black women and female children in the streets getting beat up by cops and she’s sitting pretty with her shades on on a bench. Talking about peace or whatever she said.

She doesn’t look white to me.
 
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Coddling your sons only makes things 10x worse. Then, they dont know how to respond to stern directions because hes a Mamas boy who is always coddled and gets his way when he is mad. These type of BW are a big part of the problem. They are the type to be a drill sargeant to their daughter when it comes to academics and behavior and how to “act right” but be a total softee and very lenient with their son because “its hard out there for a black man”.
 
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Isn’t Daunte’s mom white?
Yep.
Coddling your sons only makes things 10x worse. Then, they dont know how to respond to stern directions because hes a Mamas boy who is always coddled and gets his way when he is mad. These type of BW are a big part of the problem. They are the type to be a drill sargeant to their daughter when it comes to academics and behavior and how to “act right” but be a total softee and very lenient with their son because “its hard out there for a black man”.
Yep! I’m glad more black women are speaking about this behavior.
 

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