Judge orders L.A. city and county to offer shelter to everyone on skid row by fall

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A federal judge overseeing a sprawling lawsuit about homelessness in Los Angeles ordered the city and county Tuesday to offer some form of shelter or housing to the entire homeless population of skid row by October.

Judge David O. Carter granted a preliminary injunction sought by the plaintiffs in the case last week and now is telling the city and county that they must offer single women and unaccompanied children on skid row a place to stay within 90 days, help families within 120 days and finally, by Oct. 18, offer every homeless person on skid row housing or shelter.

It’s unclear whether the city and county will challenge the order, which also calls for the city to put $1 billion into an escrow account — an idea that has raised concerns among city officials.

The ruling argues that L.A. city and county wrongly focused on permanent housing at the expense of more temporary shelter, “knowing that massive development delays were likely while people died in the streets.” That element of the order underscores the judge’s skepticism of a core part of L.A.'s current strategy to tackle homelessness.

Los Angeles has lost its parks, beaches, schools, sidewalks, and highway systems due to the inaction of city and county officials who have left our homeless citizens with no other place to turn,” Carter wrote in a 110-page brief sprinkled with quotes from Abraham Lincoln and an extensive history of how skid row was first created.


“All of the rhetoric, promises, plans, and budgeting cannot obscure the shameful reality of this crisis — that year after year, there are more homeless Angelenos, and year after year, more homeless Angelenos die on the streets.” Last year more than 1,300 homeless people died in Los Angeles County.

In the last homeless count in January 2020, more than 4,600 unhoused people were found to be living on skid row — about 2,500 in large shelters and 2,093 on the streets. They account for only slightly more than 10% of the city’s overall homeless population, and it’s not clear what Carter’s order might mean for other parts of the city.


The judge wrote that “after adequate shelter is offered,” he would allow the city to enforce laws that keep streets and sidewalks clear of tents so long as they’re consistent with previous legal rulings that have limited the enforcement of such rules. That appears to only apply to skid row.

He also ordered the county to offer “support services to all homeless residents who accept the offer of housing” including placements in “appropriate emergency, interim, or permanent housing and treatment services.” The costs would be split by the city and county, he said.

Rob Wilcox, a spokesman for the city attorney’s office, said Tuesday that city lawyers are reviewing the order. He declined to comment further.

Skip Miller, partner at the Miller Barondess law firm, which is outside counsel for the county in the lawsuit, said the county is “now evaluating our options, including the possibility of an appeal.”

 
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That should work.

It's possible for the City of Angels to set precedent worldwide in the state's stewardship of the poor, homeless and mentally ill.

Don't drop the ball!
 
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I watched a documentary that said some people there do not want to leave because they know when they do, the area will be redeveloped into expensive property. Their theory was that every incentive to get them to move wasn’t actually for their benefit, but for the benefit of the city so they can get new income sources after the property is built on since it’s prime real estate.

Idk how true that is, but it was interesting to hear that perspective.
 
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I watched a documentary that said some people there do not want to leave because they know when they do, the area will be redeveloped into expensive property. Their theory was that every incentive to get them to move wasn’t actually for their benefit, but for the benefit of the city so they can get new income sources after the property is built on since it’s prime real estate.

Idk how true that is, but it was interesting to hear that perspective.
Although there’s some truth to that, LA is already expensive af even with the homelessness. I live in LA a lot of homeless people on streets suffer from mental illness/Drug abuse in that particular area skid row dtla some of them just are used to staying on the streets now unfortunately they rather do that then go to a shelter because of rules like curfews etc smh
 
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Those numbers are LIGHT and shouldn't even be mentioned.

Post pandemic numbers have exploded and are unreal Skid Row has almost doubled in length and now almost every community has their own personal skid row,. Parks, beaches, on ramps, off ramps, bridges....

I need to hear the plan for those who refuse this shelter. So many are too far gone mentally and drug-wise. They can be a huge threat to safety and there's daily stories of them randomly lashing out and even killing folks. I always feel that they are unaccounted for. Will they continue to roam the streets?

I want to believe this is actually happening but I'm losing faith when see how out of control things have gotten and how things have gone unchecked before this announcement

This would be amazing but Skid Row is now only a teeny part
 
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A lot of the people down there (from what I can see from the videos) are Black people. I think we really need some form of societal change as well.

This is good step but it doesnt address some of the root cause issues like mental health that has led many out there. Also this overpriced hand to mouth existence many are forced to live.

We need affordable housing, various flexible work options.
 
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Its a start now how will it be executed. They should renovate old buildings & build affordable and transitional housing for those people. Dont just send then off. This would be a good chance to build up a whole community and create more jobs for people who want to help.
Community center that would hold weekly job fairs, neighborhood clinics, mental health services, temp facilities.
So many possibilities but leaders, government will blame it on not being enough money. There's enough money in L.A. alone it could probably help homelessness in 2 or 3 other cities in California.

#itcanbedone this should/could be applied to every city with more than 1 million people living in it.
 
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DC has mandatory homeless housing rules when there are certain temps but people do not always want to go. DC constantly holds eviction events to remove the tent cities that pop up under bridges near downtown areas & they pop right back up.
 
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A lot of the people down there (from what I can see from the videos) are Black people. I think we really need some form of societal change as well.
I did some reading that said before WWII, most of the people there were Jews, Greeks, and Italians. It was always skid row and poor, but there was a clear shift at some point. I am very curious and I guess I'll have to keep reading to see what made it what it is now.
 
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A lot of the people down there (from what I can see from the videos) are Black people. I think we really need some form of societal change as well.

This is good step but it doesnt address some of the root cause issues like mental health that has led many out there. Also this overpriced hand to mouth existence many are forced to live.

We need affordable housing, various flexible work options.

my son moved out there a few years ago. thru him, I was really surprised a) how many people go out there with just a one-way ticket and literally no plans/job/real housing set up and b) how easy it was for a young, healthy person to get government subsidizing (this was before Covid). a few people my son knew from our area are among the homeless out there. we tried to help one guy, but it was just constantly hitting walls. he didn’t have/couldn’t afford a phone so harder to apply for jobs (again, didn’t realize how many minimum wage places want you to apply on line). he lost his state ID from here and didn’t have any paperwork to get a Cali one, again for looking for a job. and he wasn’t very motivated/had no hustle except for finding weed, lol. it’s very sad, I think he’s in prison actually. I always wish we could have helped him more, but again, it’s hard to be more invested in someone’s life than they are shrug.

I don’t know the answers, but I give props to the people who try to find them day in and day out (as opposed to the virtue signalers posting for the gram).
 
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So are they planning on supporting these people indefinitely? How will this work?
The same way they've been supporting illegal immigrants in that Sanctuary city for years... if Cali can house and give support to foreigners that show up uninvited, they should have no problem doing this for homeless veterans and Americans.
 
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Hmm I winder if they will use the NY model and make a deal with hotels to house them.
They've already done that. They moved the homeless that were in Echo park to some hotel, forget the name. I was watching a youtuber German in Venice that chronicles a lot of it. Now a lot of other youtubers have popped up covering it, and it seems to have turned into homeless porn for many. I have stopped watching. When I first did it was because I had no idea what was going on. I also found a Black lady who is a beautifican that goes out and washes hair, give haircuts and other grooming that I have cashapped Beauty 2 the Streets, as after watching all of that I did want to do something to help.

There is also a man now interviewing the prostitutes down there who is getting mega views and ad revenue $$, so many are exploiting their plight. I gained a lot of insight though in watching some of the stories, but again, stopped watching once I felt informed.
 
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my son moved out there a few years ago. thru him, I was really surprised a) how many people go out there with just a one-way ticket and literally no plans/job/real housing set up and b) how easy it was for a young, healthy person to get government subsidizing (this was before Covid). a few people my son knew from our area are among the homeless out there. we tried to help one guy, but it was just constantly hitting walls. he didn’t have/couldn’t afford a phone so harder to apply for jobs (again, didn’t realize how many minimum wage places want you to apply on line). he lost his state ID from here and didn’t have any paperwork to get a Cali one, again for looking for a job. and he wasn’t very motivated/had no hustle except for finding weed, lol. it’s very sad, I think he’s in prison actually. I always wish we could have helped him more, but again, it’s hard to be more invested in someone’s life than they are **shrug**.

I don’t know the answers, but props to the people who try to find them day in and day out (as opposed to the virtue signalers posting for the gram).

This world is so cold, and many like it that way. Due to my work with vulnerable populations, my unpaid non profit work that was/is self funded, I know first hand how not having an ID and the hoops that must be jumped sometimes to get one, HAS destroyed lives. Some people do need someone to hold their hand every step of the way, which is what my nonprofit was doing. Assiting young people move from point A to point B, wherever point A may be. For many it was an ID, it was help completing the FAFSA, completing a application and having someone there every step of the way. Due to the realities of life and paying my own bills I had to go back to work, and sadly my work has consumed me for the most part, with my employer heaping more and more and more and more on my back (that's a whole other post).

Many of us love this whole have and have not dynamic, love having someone to look down on, its all very UNCIVILIZED to me. Then factor in the mainstream culture that is saying do drugs, do crime, its a stepping stone to becoming a billionaire, it's really a wrap.

If we wanted to solve the problem we could. There are too many groups invested in these societal dysfunction at this point. It's big business in one way or another.

The people have tried to speak up, tried to say People over Profits, and even movements are infiltrated for personal gain or to raise ones' profile (for some personal gain). I must admit that I myself am a bit disillusioned right now, shit I am disillusioned because it is a dog eat dog world but I naively thought we could change that, that there were more good people than bad and indifferent people. It's complicated I know. Anyway, rant/vent over. Some of us wish we could do more, so I'm with you on that. But the problem is too big for 1 person, sadly and unfortunately.
 
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Some people do need someone to hold their hand every step of the way, which is what my nonprofit was doing. Assiting young people move from point A to point B, wherever point A may be. For many it was an ID, it was help completing the FAFSA, completing a application and having someone there every step of the way.
So what would be the best way to find an organization to get involved doing things like that where I live? My kids are grown and (almost, lol) out of the house. Stuff like that is in my wheelhouse—problem-solving, application stuff, giving young people advice (even if not asked, lol). Sometimes it’s just not knowing where to start to help that dissuades people from getting involved. I don’t want to be “boots on the ground” (again I salute those who do), but this kind of help I could do.
 
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A federal judge’s explosive order calling on Los Angeles to offer shelter or housing to every homeless person on skid row is setting off growing alarm that his decision could upend years of homeless policy in the city, stalling construction of dozens of housing projects.

Earlier this week, Judge David O. Carter threw a major wrench into L.A.'s plan for addressing homelessness, demanding that Mayor Eric Garcetti take roughly $1 billion he had been planning to spend on the crisis and put it into an escrow account. At the same time, he issued a blistering critique of the Proposition HHH program, the 2016 bond measure whose projects have been beset by delays and rising costs.

Some HHH developers, who already have projects under construction or are months away from breaking ground, said they fear Carter intends to raid HHH funding and direct the money elsewhere.

The order is also drawing fresh criticism from city leaders, who say it lacks a basic grasp of how municipal budgets work.

“The idea that the city has billions of dollars just lying around that are not being used right now, that we could just write a check and put it into an escrow account, doesn’t make sense,” said Councilman Paul Krekorian, who heads the council’s budget committee.

The scramble to decipher Carter’s order, and decide when and how to push back, has consumed much of the city’s energy since Tuesday, when the judge instructed L.A. officials to offer every homeless resident of skid row shelter or housing by mid-October.

Carter, who chided the city for failing to show a sense of urgency, called for an immediate halt to all sales and leases of city property for projects that were not in progress as of Tuesday.

He demanded audits of an array of homelessness programs, including Proposition HHH, which is expected to provide funds next year for more than 5,600 units of housing that offer support services, such as mental health or substance abuse counseling.

Most importantly, the judge zeroed in on Garcetti’s promise — announced Monday outside the Griffith Observatory — that the city would spend nearly $1 billion to address homelessness. Carter instructed the city to put $1 billion in an escrow account “forthwith,” and show that each source of the funds is “accounted for” within seven days.

Garcetti, appearing in North Hollywood Thursday at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the opening of a tiny-home village for homeless residents, said the city would have “a very, very strong case” if it decides to file an appeal. Los Angeles County officials have already chosen that path.

Beyond that, Garcetti said, the judge’s order will set up new bureaucratic barriers just as the city is getting momentum with Proposition HHH. More than a third of the nearly $1 billion planned by Garcetti would come from Proposition HHH, which would finance development and construction of 89 permanent housing projects during the next fiscal year.

Officials expect at least 56 HHH projects to be under construction on July 1, when the new fiscal year starts.

“We see this as actually adding friction and slowing things down, not necessarily helping things out,” Garcetti said.

The city’s HHH developers were even more unsettled.

Ed Holder, vice president of real estate development for Mercy Housing California, said he worries that the judge’s decision to take control of the mayor’s homelessness money — and his sharp criticism of the HHH program overall — could result in developers pushing back their construction schedules or failing to meet their financial obligations.

Mercy Housing is looking to start construction in July on a 92-unit project in L.A.’s skid row area. The San Francisco-based nonprofit group spent nearly three years assembling city, county and state funds and locking down a private loan — and has placed a huge order for factory-built apartments.

“We have over $2 million of our own money invested in this project,” he said. “I’m very concerned that an injunction would freeze all the progress we have made.”

Stephanie Klasky-Gamer, president and chief executive of LA Family Housing, said she fears that Carter’s order could jeopardize 13 projects her nonprofit group is developing. Of those, seven would receive funding from Proposition HHH.

Klasky-Gamer said investors in her group’s projects have been calling her worried that Carter’s demands could imperil city funding for those developments.

“It’s beyond frustrating right now. I would say it’s frightening,” she said. “His solution is not repairing what’s broken. His solution is actually destroying what does work.”
The judge’s order represents the latest chapter in a yearlong legal battle waged against the city and county by the L.A. Alliance for Human Rights, a group of downtown business owners and residents. The group contends the city and county have badly mismanaged the region’s homeless crisis, wasted public money and violated the civil rights of those who live on the streets.

In his 110-page order, Carter took aim at the HHH program, which focused heavily on construction of permanent housing with accompanying services. He said the city and county had made a “deliberate, political choice” to pursue permanent housing at the expense of immediate shelter, despite knowing that “massive development delays were likely while people died in the streets.”

Antipoverty activists have expressed concern that the order, and its tight timeline for offering people in skid row housing or shelter, would cause the city to set up cheap and temporary facilities to comply with it while failing to solve the underlying problem.

But the Rev. Andy Bales, chief executive of the Union Rescue Mission on skid row, welcomed the judge’s decision, saying it could “end skid row as we know it.”

Carter has accurately assessed the deadly tradeoff that L.A. has made, Bales said, by focusing its HHH dollars so heavily on permanent housing. Those types of projects frequently cost more and take longer to construct than other forms of shelter, he said.

“Why would anybody want people to die on the streets while they’re slowly rolling out help for a few?” he asked.

Bales said the order could allow for swift construction of tiny homes, mobile homes or other housing that is less expensive than HHH projects. And he dismissed the idea that the city is incapable of putting up the money demanded by the judge.

“You can’t say one night, ‘Hey, I’ve got a billion dollars,’ and the next night when you’re asked to put a billion in escrow, you say, ‘I don’t have a billion.’”

Krekorian, who heads the council’s budget committee, disputed that assessment.

Garcetti’s proposal for spending nearly $1 billion has not yet gone before the City Council for review and approval. Because the money will be spent during the fiscal year that starts July 1, it “doesn’t exist yet,” the councilman said.

In addition, much of the money to pay for Garcetti’s homeless initiatives will flow into city coffers gradually over the coming year, not all at once, city officials said.

For example, housing funds from President Biden’s American Rescue Plan have not yet arrived. State dollars for homelessness prevention are expected in late summer. And more than half the HHH funds that Garcetti plans to use won’t be available until after the city issues more bonds, most likely in the fall, officials said this week.

The federal government won’t reimburse the city for operating Project Homekey sites, or motels converted into housing, until after that money is spent locally. The same is true of the city’s “rapid rehousing” initiative, which moves people into private apartments.

“There’s a lot of basics of budgeting that aren’t reflected” in the judge’s demand, Krekorian said.

If Carter insists on getting the $1 billion immediately, city leaders would ultimately have to pull funds out of every other program, Garcetti said.

“We’d basically shut down most of our day-to-day operations,” the mayor said.
 
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Just because a judge orders something doesn't mean it can happen overnight. I mean shit, the city was offering free hotel rooms and loads of mofos say no thanks, pass.

This problem is not as cut and dry as everyone thinks. Shit, I can walk outside right now and go look at the bums under the bridge literally next to my crib. They aren't trying to go to nobody's shelter and it's not like you can force them.

Idk it's crazy but its a problem I don't think is going away until the Olympics forces the city to ship them out to Coachella or another desert locale.
 
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Eric is trying to give the LAPD $3 billion. He better rework the budget and make it happen. The homelessness is out of hand in certain parts of LA.
 
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Just because a judge orders something doesn't mean it can happen overnight. I mean shit, the city was offering free hotel rooms and loads of mofos say no thanks, pass.

This problem is not as cut and dry as everyone thinks. Shit, I can walk outside right now and go look at the bums under the bridge literally next to my crib. They aren't trying to go to nobody's shelter and it's not like you can force them.

Idk it's crazy but its a problem I don't think is going away until the Olympics forces the city to ship them out to Coachella or another desert locale.
Nice to see you ashbee
 
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Just because a judge orders something doesn't mean it can happen overnight. I mean shit, the city was offering free hotel rooms and loads of mofos say no thanks, pass.

This problem is not as cut and dry as everyone thinks. Shit, I can walk outside right now and go look at the bums under the bridge literally next to my crib. They aren't trying to go to nobody's shelter and it's not like you can force them.

Idk it's crazy but its a problem I don't think is going away until the Olympics forces the city to ship them out to Coachella or another desert locale.

That’s very true. It’s great that people who want help may get it but the truth is many don’t. I know from firsthand experience because my brother was homeless and refused to get off the streets for several years. He hung in the skid row area for part of the time. He said shelters were dangerous and he didn’t like their rules anyway. He had addiction and mental health issues like so many do.
 
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How is it the city's responsibility that peope are homeless? No trying to be cruel, it's a genuine question.
Wait what?

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