Wilder v Fury II

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Wilder: Fury Fought As Dirty As Possible, But Bayless Let Him Get Away With It
By Keith Idec Published On Tue Feb 25, 2020, 08:38 AM EST

Tyson Fury commended Kenny Bayless for the job that the veteran referee did during his rematch with Deontay Wilder on Saturday night. (photo by Ryan Hafey)

Wilder wasn’t nearly as complimentary.

The former WBC heavyweight champion criticized Bayless during an extensive interview with BoxingScene.com on Monday for allowing Fury to “fight dirty.” Wilder believes Bayless should’ve done much more to prevent Fury from hitting him on the back of his head and neck, and from holding his head while leaning on him during a rematch Fury won by seventh-round technical knockout.

“Credit to Tyson Fury,” Wilder said to BoxingScene.com. “I’m very happy for him and his accomplishment, and I wish him many congratulations. And it was a perfect game plan [for Fury]. But he didn’t come to box. He came to really, really, really make the fight as dirty as possible.”

Bayless deducted a point from Fury for hitting Wilder when he called for a break late in the fifth round. By then, Wilder feels Fury had gotten away with too many outcome-altering fouls for it to make a difference.

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Wilder also contends that the 6-feet-9, 273-pound Fury hit him on the back of his head to cause a knockdown during the third round.

That was the first of two knockdowns Wilder suffered in his first professional defeat. The second knockdown was the result of Fury’s left to the body during the fifth round.

“When I woke up the next morning, I felt so many knots and bruises on the back of my head and neck,” Wilder said. “[After the first knockdown], I turned over immediately to look at Kenny Bayless because he just made this speech about how he’s gonna take points from me and disqualify me if I hit in the back of the head and hit after the break. But I guess those rules just applied to me, and not my opponent, because he did it all night long and didn’t get penalized until it was too late.”

The 34-year-old Wilder doesn’t fault Fury for trying to get away with as much as he can to win a fight. The Tuscaloosa, Alabama, native just can’t understand why Bayless wasn’t more assertive about enforcing the rules.

“I immediately turned around and opened my arms,” Wilder said, referring to what he said to Bayless following the first knockdown. “I was like, ‘What’s going on, bro? Are you serious? Did you see that?’ [After] that speech that you gave me, you’re supposed to protect the fighter. Fury was putting me in headlocks and still hitting me in the body, leaning over on me and still hitting me in the body. And due respect to him. He’s only doing what a fighter is supposed to do, fight and win. If you’re getting away with dirty tactics, then why not keep doing it? So, I understand that.

“It’s up to the referee to be a man of his word. You come back here [to Wilder’s locker room] and you’re doing all this fancy talk, [saying] you’ve gotta abide by your rules. It just seems like I can’t get the right referee in the ring to save my life. One took too long to count and one allowed dirty tactics, and then took a point when it was too late, when it didn’t even matter no more. And Fury knew it. He knew it. He didn’t come to box. He came to fight dirty and the referee let him get away with it. But I congratulate him on his win and the accomplishment that he’s done. I’m very excited for him and moving on.”

Wilder (42-1-1, 41 KOs) previously criticized California referee Jack Reiss after his controversial split draw with Fury (30-0-1, 21 KOs) in December 2018 for what Wilder perceived as affording Fury extra time to get up from a 12th-round knockdown. Fury incredibly got up from Wilder’s vicious right-left combination in the final round, fought back hard and made it to the final bell at Staples Center in Los Angeles.
 
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Fury vs. Joshua is The Next Mega-Event: Taking a Look Back
By Ron Lewis Published On Tue Feb 25, 2020, 01:24 AM EST

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Time moves on quickly in boxing. Right now, the only huge heavyweight clash in the sport would be Tyson Fury and Anthony Joshua. And after his demolition of Deontay Wilder at the weekend, not that many people are confidently predicting a Joshua win should they meet.

As far as it is known, Fury and Joshua have only shared a ring once, a decade ago, and at the time, Fury happily admitted that it was Joshua who got the better of things.

It was Fury who was one of the first to let on to the world that there was a talented heavyweight lurking in North London called Anthony Joshua. Now they seem to be increasingly bitter rivals, on a collision course to one of the biggest fights in boxing history, then they were young fighters making their way in the sport.

Fury has been a professional for two years at that point, Joshua had just won the ABA super-heavyweight title, but only a few people really had an idea of his potential. However, those behind him were confident enough to offer Joshua up for some sparring with the 6ft 9in prospect at Finchley Boxing Club, where he gave Fury a bit of a hiding.

“He’s red hot,” Fury told Steve Bunce’s radio show at the time. “I thought I have only got to take it easy because he is only an amateur and he probably won’t spar again if I go mad.

“He’s rushed out at me and threw a one-two, left hook, and I slipped and slide. And bash he hit me a big uppercut right on the point of the chin. If I had a weak chin like David Price, I would have been knocked out for a month.

“He is very, very, very good and only young, 20. Watch out for that name, Anthony Joshua.”

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Their relationship changed soon after, as Joshua’s stratospheric rise through the amateur ranks to Olympic gold in 2012 was followed by equally fast progression through the professional ranks to the point where he picked up all of the belts that Fury had won from Wladimir Klitschko, almost as quickly as Fury was handing them back.

Legend has it that when George Harrison was once asked what he would have been if The Beatles had not been a success, he answered “a better guitarist”. Likewise, there are those that think Joshua was prevented from being the best he could have been by becoming a world champion when he did.

Had Tyson Fury not gone off the rails and given up the titles he won from Wladimir Klitschko, Joshua’s rise to being a world champion would have been significantly delayed.

When Fury beat Klitschko, Joshua had not even boxed for the British title. Fury never defended any of his world titles. He was stripped of the IBF belt soon after he won it and then handed back the WBA, IBO and WBO titles when depression drove him into a life of drink, drugs and over-eating.

Fury’s problems became an opportunity for Joshua and his promoter, Eddie Hearn. So when, in April 2016, Joshua challenged Charles Martin for the IBF title, the thinking was not whether Joshua was ready to become world champion, but whether he was ready to beat Charles Martin. There is no doubt he was, as he quickly demonstrated.

The problem was, as a world champion, you have to have world-title fights. So, his training was thereafter tailored his next title fights, rather than developing Joshua into a completely rounded fighter. The years of development and sparring for the hell of it were missed out.

The biggest risk was taken when Joshua boxed Klitschko, which was seen as a “then or never” opportunity against a boxer, who against Fury, had shown signs that me might struggle to “pull the trigger” any more.

It all came unstuck in his first fight with Andy Ruiz Jr, when he rushed in after flooring the Mexican-American and was nailed by a shot from which he didn’t recover. It is difficult to knock his performance in the rematch. It was risk-free boxing, about as far away from the naturally aggressive younger Joshua as you could get.

Joshua is certainly nowhere as bad as the naysayers suggest, but neither is he as good as the hype. However, those are statements that could count for any boxer, including Fury.

He does offer Fury a different challenge to Wilder. Likewise, Joshua has always been happier fighting taller opponents than shorter ones. Fury, though, has now proved his ability once and for all. The question mark still hovers over Joshua.
 
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Some ancient history. A Black fighter named Lloyd Honeyghan once dropped a belt to avoid fighting a Boer from South Africa because of Apartied. Shirley Finkel got Mark Breland to take the fight instead. This was in 1987.

The Breland-Volbrecht fight was originally scheduled as a title elimination bout, with the winner earning a shot at champion Lloyd Honeyghan of England. But Honeyghan, who is black, said he would not fight Volbrecht if he defeated Breland because of South Africa's apartheid government. Honeyghan, who also owns the World Boxing Council and International Boxing Federation titles, relinquished the WBA championship to avoid meeting Volbrecht.

South African Harold Volbrecht, who will fight Mark Breland...

BoxRec: Mark Breland
 

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